Pavillon 54’s magazine is a space for discovery, learnings and dialogue on Modern and Contemporary Art from Africa and its diaspora. Through articles, interviews, editorial coverage, videos, exhibitions and experiences, the Pavillon 54 community will learn, be informed and involved in current events in the African art world.

  • Aida Muluneh limited edition prints
    The 99 Series, Part 7, 2013 © Aida Muluneh

    The term ‘print’ can often give the impression of a cheap, mass-produced printed piece of paper that doesn’t have much value. But did you know that some of the most expensive prints by Edvard Munch and Pablo Picasso have exceeded a value of millions of pounds? This misunderstood medium has great value in the art market, but when you begin to collect photography or artist prints, there is essential information that should be kept in mind, in order to understand the long-term value of the artwork. There is a lot of specific terminology and factors that may be encountered when trying to acquire such a work, such as ‘limited edition’, an extension to an edition, the number of works in the series, and what this can mean for the value of these prints. Here at Pavillon54, we represent some incredible African photographers and work only with limited edition prints. So, what does this mean for a collector when acquiring a limited-edition print via Pavillon54?

  • cultural appropriation dreads fashion

    If you look at certain industries and social media in the past few years, ‘cultural appropriation’ seems to have become a hot topic, particularly in the fashion and music spheres. For all the talk of cultural appropriation, however, it is difficult to pinpoint what exactly cultural appropriation is, and how it can affect everything from the African art market to our individual, day-to-day lives.

  • Wangechi Muti, Forbidden Fruit Picker (2015)
    Wangechi Muti, Forbidden Fruit Picker (2015)

    Take a look at our list of the ten most expensive African artists to date, and you’ll see that women take up a significant proportion of the cut—even taking the top place! Unlike in the Western contemporary art market, top female African artists often see great success and prominence in their careers, on par with their male counterparts. In this article, we break down which seven female African contemporary artists are stealing the show, and the ones you should keep an eye on.

     

  • Corporate art collections:

    Why companies build them
    TD Bank – Mies van der Rohe chairs and Jack Bush’s Rose
    TD Bank – Mies van der Rohe and Jack Bush’s Rose

    Did you know that some of the most prolific, high quality art collections in the world belong to banks? For example, Deutsche Bank, one of the primary sponsors for Frieze art fair, has collected over 70,000 artworks over the years. But why are big businesses and corporations interested in collecting art? And can small to medium-sized businesses follow suit?

  • In the spirit of Pavillon54’s mission: to create the first and foremost digital platform dedicated to developing the arts and culture of Africa — by Africans, for Africans, we are partnering with the Mosi-oa-Tunya Art Charity to present an exciting sale of artworks that belong to the collection of a prominent and avid African art collector.

  • Liam Booysen, Black Lives Matter
    © Liam Booysen

    Though the Black Lives Matter movement is by no means a new initiative, the outrage and consequent protests that ensued after the murder of George Floyd earlier this year have resulted in a common expectation for brands, museums, institutions, and other businesses to respond and act. Most likely, all of us have seen some kind of news article or social media post about this issue, but how has the Black Lives Matter movement affected the arts, and more specifically the African art scene?

  • Ablade Glover's painting named Ghananian Market Intrigue, 1934
    Ablade Glover's Ghanaian Market Intrigue (2010), oil on canvas, 122 x 122cm

    Read any article on African Contemporary Art, and you will find that most all will steer away from defining what exactly African contemporary art is—and with good reason. With fifty-four countries and cultures making up the continent of Africa, it is almost impossible to pin-point what ‘African’ art looks like, let alone bracket the time period for when contemporary African art began.

  • Yinka Shonibabe, British Library, Tate, Black Artist, Contemporary Art, British Art
    Yinka Shonibare CBE, The British Library 2014 (detail) | © Tate

    As auction houses establish sales dedicated to African modern and contemporary art, galleries look to diversify their rosters of artists, and the African art market continues to grow, it is important to take note of which artworks and artists are performing well. This is especially true if you are hoping to make an investment in African art. Below, we have compiled the top 10 most expensive African artists to date, highlighting which works landed them the record-breaking position, and why.

  • El Anatsui

    Of Bonds and Bottle Caps
    El Anatsui's Gravity and Grace Monumental Works
    El Anatsui's Gravity and Grace Monumental Works (2009), Brooklyn Museum | © Eva Blue-Flickr.jpg

    As you descend the steps into the British Museum’s ‘Africa’ wing, you are immediately confronted by a sculpture, large in scale, that resembles a swathe of draped cloth—except the piece is made from bottle tops and discarded wrappers. It is ‘Man’s Cloth’ by El Anatsui, a piece made in his distinctive wall sculpture style. So it is that this Ghanaian contemporary artist cemented himself within African Art History in the eyes of one of the Western world’s most prominent public institutions.

  • Ethiopia picture girl photography Veronica Alves dos Santos Brazilian artist
    Veronica Alves dos Santos's Confidence - Ethiopia (2018), print on cotton paper, 30 x 50 cm

    Are you a collector, looking to invest in the African art market? Or perhaps you are an artist, wondering where your own work fits within the scope of contemporary African art. Maybe you’re a student, researcher, or even just a fan. No matter who you are, African art spans a whole range of countries, cultures and historical periods, and it can often be challenging to start talking about African modern and contemporary art. With so much information out there, how can you even begin your quest? Here are some simple pointers to get you started.

  • Inspired by Africa: Henri Matisse

    Series: Inspired by Africa
    Kuba Cloth influence on western artists
    Left: Kuba Cloth from Matisse’s Collection, artist unknown. Right: Matisse's Red Interior still life on a blue table (1942)

    The influences of African art on various artists and movements throughout history recount fascinating stories of cultural exchange, theft, homage and colonialism. In this series of articles, Inspired by Africa, we assess the ways that some of the most famous artists in the world borrowed from African art to create some of their masterpieces. For the third installation of this series, we survey the works of Henri Matisse, and the African countries he took inspiration from.

  • Inspired by Africa: Pablo Picasso

    Series: Inspired by Africa
    Pablo Picasso's Les demoiselles d'Avignon, most famous painting inspired by African culture and art
    Pablo Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907), oil on canvas, 243.9 cm × 233.7 cm

    The influences of African art on various artists and movements throughout history recount fascinating stories of cultural exchange, theft, homage and colonialism. In this series of articles, Inspired by Africa, we assess the ways that some of the most famous artists in the world borrowed from African art to create some of their masterpieces. First and foremost, we visit the works of perhaps the most acclaimed artist of the modern era: Pablo Picasso.

  • Inspired by Africa: Jean-Michel Basquiat

    Series: Inspired by Africa
    Jean-Michel Basquiat's most famous painting
    Jean-Michel Basquiat's Untitled (1982), work in oil stick, acrylic and spray paint

    The influences of African art on various artists and movements throughout history recount fascinating stories of cultural exchange, theft, homage and colonialism. In this series of articles, Inspired by Africa, we assess the ways that some of the most famous artists in the world borrowed from African art to create some of their masterpieces. For this second exploration, we examine how adored New York artist Jean Michel-Basquiat searched his roots to battle racism and create his unique artistic vision.

  • What does Blockchain mean for the African art market?

    It is undeniable: online art sales continue to grow. According to the ‘Hiscox online art trade report 2018’, the amount of art bought online has shown consistent growth over the past five years, although admittedly the rate of growth has decreased. This consistent increase in the online art market demonstrates that digital means of buying and selling art are becoming more prolific, thereby opening new modes of buying and selling to different demographics and countries, such as the growing wealthy class in Africa. However, the lull in the rate of growth reveals some reservations about the uncertain future of the online art market. This can largely be attributed to a recent surge of debate surrounding new modes of technology being introduced into the art industry, and the disagreement about what could result. Amongst these new technologies, blockchain appears to be the most divisive by far.

  • What to know when buying art?

    5 Questions to Ask Yourself when Buying Art
    Buying art

    The possibilities of buying art grow ever more abundant. Indeed, these days, the dual-swoop of new, innovative digital art galleries and the increasing trend in the wealthy investing in art means that the art market is booming, particularly online. Among those using online platforms are wealthy millennials, many of whom are first-time buyers. If you count yourself among those who are interested in acquiring art for the first time, there are a few important questions to ask yourself before you make that big purchase. Below we’ve listed what to know when buying art, including some of the most important factors to consider.

  • Buying art online
    © Getty Images

    It is undeniable: online art sales continue to grow. According to the ‘Hiscox online art trade report 2018’, the amount of art bought online has shown consistent growth over the past five years. In addition to this, 79% of young art buyers (under the age of 35) expressed that they use social media, especially Instagram, to discover new artists, and 32% of buyers said that social media had a significant impact in their decision to purchase art. This consistent increase in online methods of scouting the art market demonstrates that purchasing art digitally is becoming more prolific. Artech start-ups pioneered the way for making means of buying and selling art online easier and more convenient than ever, however we are also seeing traditional art institutions incorporate online methods of buying art. Regardless of whether one prefers to go with young, innovating start-up companies, or massive auction houses with decades of legacy, therefore, it is irrefutable that art e-commerce is a crucial facet of the future of the art market. Here are three benefits of buying art online that have spurred on this revolution.

  • African Contemporary art trending
    Didier Claes booth, AKAA Art Fair, Paris, November 2019

    For all the talk of the ‘African Art Boom’ in recent years, it isn’t always evident why is African contemporary art trending and what this boom entails, how it came to be, or what the future of the African art market is. 

     

     
  • Yinka Shonibare, CBE (RA)

    A Foot in Two Continents
    Yinka Shonibare' work named Fake Death Picture or The Suicide, created in 2011
    Yinka Shonibare's Fake Death Picture (The Suicide - Manet) (2011), digital chromogenic print

    The story of British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare is one that spans two continents, countries and cultures. He was born in London, but moved to Nigeria when he was three years old, where he spent his childhood. The straddling of these two nations, and ultimately two cultural identities, thus has a profound influence on his work, which often engages with themes of identity, globalisation and post-colonisation.

  • Lubaina Himid's work named Navigation Charts Spike Island and created on 2017
    Lubaina Himid's Navigation Charts Spike Island (2017) | © Photo: Stuart Whipps

    Lubaina Himid CBE (b.1954) is both an artist and a curator. She has made her mark in the art world by furthering the Black Arts Movement, of which she was one of the primary members in the United Kingdom in the 1980s. She particularly centres her work around black female artists, both in terms of subject matter for her own art, and assisting the careers of fellow women artists.

  • Why Pavillon 54?

    A word from Dana Endundo Ferreira, Founder of Pavillon 54, about building the global technology platform for African creativity
    by Dana Endundo Ferreira
    Dana Endundo Ferreira, CEO and Founder of Pavillon 54, The leading platform for modern and contemporary African art, artists, collectors
    Dana Endundo Ferreira, CEO & Founder @ Pavillon54

    A word from Dana Endundo Ferreira, Founder of Pavillon 54, about building the global technology platform for African creativity

     

  • Dana Endundo Ferreira looking at artwork sculpture installation from Ghanaian artist El Anatsui at Frieze art fair london 2019. buy African contemporary and modern art online artists discover information education exhibition art diaspora
    Delta’, El Anatsui, 2014 at Frieze Art Fair London 2019

    Chances are, little more than what you see in the news.  But for those of us lucky enough to live or travel there, we know of its beauty, creativity and ingenuity. That's what we highlight at Pavillon 54.